In the News

Thursday, 25 July 2013

 

Last week, I was pleased to join with local dignitaries at the launch of the Small Business Summit Greater Western Sydney, organised by the Sydney Hills Business Chamber. This fantastic event, to be held on Wednesday, 14th August, 2013 at the Hillsong Convention Centre, will bring together people from all avenues of business, public service and government from across 16 chambers of commerce. Topics of discussion will include government plans that affect growth in the region, obstacles to doing business in GWS and forms of support available to small business in Western Sydney. Tickets can be purchased online. Be sure to book soon to secure your seat!

 

By contrast, the Rudd-Gillard Government’s attack on fringe benefits tax (FBT) will result in an increased regulatory burden on small business and place increased pressure on families across Western Sydney. It is estimated that this blatant tax grab will hit those with a car as part of their salary package on average by $1,400 a year. If you are a sales rep with a company car, a nurse or a teacher with a salary-packaged vehicle then this decision is bad news for you and your family. Small business is carrying much of the burden of 21,000 new regulations as well as the carbon tax and these changes to FBT have come at the worst possible time. The Coalition will not proceed with these changes if elected because we understand the huge cost of living pressures affecting families and businesses across the nation

 

Thursday, 25 July 2013

 

Wednesday, 24 July 2013


 

Alex Hawke
MP, Federal Member for Mitchell said the Coalition did not support Labor’s $1.8
billion hit on the car industry.

 

“This tax
hike will cost thousands of local families an average of $1,400 per year”, said
Alex Hawke MP.

 

 

“It has been
estimated that 75 per cent of drivers with salary packaged vehicles earn less
than $100,000 – so this is another hit on families.

 

“The
policies of the Rudd-Gillard Government have put enormous pressure on families.

 

“There’s
been the carbon tax, the changes to the private health insurance rebate, the
increased superannuation taxes, the increased child care costs, the loss of
promised family payments and now changes to the arrangements for the FBT on
cars.         

 

 

“If you are
a sales rep with a company car, a nurse or a teacher with a salary-packaged
vehicle then this decision is bad news for you and your family.

 

 

“As the
Member of Parliament who represents the most families in the country, these
changes greatly concern me because of the significant impact it will have on
members of our local community.”

 

 

Alex Hawke
said he promised that if elected, a Coalition government will not proceed with
these changes.

 

 

“Once again,
this is another Kevin Rudd rush-job. This is a rushed decision that won’t just
hit families; it will also damage the economy, particularly those in the car
industry.

 

 

“It is
estimated that 35 per cent of all salary packaged vehicles are made by local
manufacturers Toyota, Ford and Holden.

 

 

“Mr Rudd is
all talk and no action, but when he finally does act he ends up destroying
people’s jobs.”

 

 

Alex Hawke
said the changes also meant more red tape for small businesses and an impact on
small businesses.

 

 

“Small
business is carrying much of the burden of 21,000 new regulations as well as
the carbon tax and this decision has come at the worst possible time.”

 

 

Alex Hawke
said this is another decision by a government that does not understand the
pressures on families, does not understand the pressures on small businesses
and that is making it up as they go along. 

Thursday, 20 June 2013

Monday, 17 June 2013

Alex Hawke
MP, Federal Member for Mitchell says the Attorney-General Mark Dreyfus has misled
the parliament on funding arrangements for the ‘Yes’ and ‘No’ case on the
Constitutional Recognition of Local Government referendum.

 

“In his
second reading summation, the Attorney-General made direct reference to my
speech, claiming that I had stated an untruth in the House. Actually, it is
that remark from the Attorney-General which is an untruth.”

 

In his
speech, the Attorney-General stated;

 

“The member for Mitchell also made the claim during
debate that the government has committed $21.6 million to a campaign to support
the yes vote at the referendum. This is simply not true. What the government
has committed to—and this is set out in the budget papers—is $10 million to fund a neutral,
non-partisan civics education campaign
.”

 

That campaign will provide the community with
information about the Constitution and the process for considering any change
in the roles of the Commonwealth, the states and local government, and about
the terms of the proposed alteration. This
education campaign will not advocate either a yes vote or a no vote but will
help ensure electors are aware of the issue and in a position to make an
informed vote.
(House of Representatives Hansard, 5th
June, 2013 – Page 93
)

 

Today, Minister for Local Government Albanese
announced that the $10 million allocated for that neutral, non-partisan
civics education campaign but would be allocated to the ‘Yes’ case based on the
vote in parliament last week;

 

The amount of funding to be provided for each case will reflect
the proportion of Members that voted for and against the Constitution
Alteration (Local Government) Amendment Bill 2013.  Over 98 per cent voted for and less than 2
per cent voted against this bill. Accordingly,
$10 million will be provided to the Australian Local Government Association
(ALGA) to assist it in its promotion of the ‘Yes’ case.
(Minister Albanese release – 17th
June, 2013 - http://anthonyalbanese.com.au/funding-provided-to-promote-public-debate-about-constitutional-change)

 

While the ‘No’ case would attract less on a strictly proportional
basis, the Government will provide up to $500,000 to proponents of the ‘No’
case. The two Members who voted against the bill will be asked to determine the
distribution of this funding.

 

At the last
referendum in 1997, both the ‘Yes’ and ‘No’ cases received $7 million each so
each side could make their case on a fair footing.

 

“Clearly,
the government is trying to buy the outcome of this referendum. Once again, the
government is guilty of announcing one thing and then doing another. Other
members of the House may have voted differently had they had known their vote
would determine the funding for the ‘Yes’ and ‘No’ cases.

 

“What needs
to happen is the Attorney-General needs to come into the House and apologise to
the Parliament and the Australian people for misleading them in this way. It is
unacceptable that on an issue as important as Constitutional Recognition that
the Attorney-General should be able to mislead the Australian people.” Alex
Hawke concluded.

Monday, 17 June 2013

 

In his second reading summation,
the Attorney-General made direct reference to my speech, claiming that I had
stated an untruth in the House. Actually, it is that remark from the
Attorney-General which is an untruth.  Click here for the full article.

Monday, 17 June 2013

Matter of Public Importance - 4 June 2013

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img="/images/stories/videos/MPI_4June2013.jpg"
width="300" height="211"}MPI_4June2013{/flv}

 

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